Transcript (view)

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alright
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a Mike sonya I think self introduction I’m
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know says currently on the chief US architect a clerestory data
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a prior I was at Google for a little over six years where i was the lead
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designer for Google Analytics and Google AdWords
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I came to Google be an acquisition called measure map
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which is a start up as a part of and I have a master’s have a communication
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design from the institute is I’m
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when I came on to Google you know I was a certain indirectly
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involving Big Data market working on Google Adwords and Google Analytics
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and it was always an interesting topic to me but when I got our
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on Google and join clerestory this was on the first impression I had when I was
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looking around
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%uh the Big Data market you know a 2000 if cell phone
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really great technology not some promise people knew that this technology is
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going to change the world
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but a little clunky like there’s still some fog between this and what we knew
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could happen
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I also notice that organizations hired people like this
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are you know who this is few people have kinda coming out a lot right so this is
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well this is Jonah Hill
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but he’s playing a character called are his peace
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he’s playing us somebody named Paul deepen Easter where he was hired by the
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Oakland Athletics
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not tell a little story I’m sure a lot of Bay Area people know the story but
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also Oakland Athletics are famous for having a really low
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payroll compared to other major league baseball teams and they’re struggling to
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compete to the hired a guy like this who was bringing in a new way of thinking
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how to evaluate talent
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cell Paula he did is he to use to Malaga rhythms and ate up so he is really a
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data scientist where he could use all this information
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and uncover undervalued players other organizations were ignoring for
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various reasons and so a lot of organizations
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seem to think that this is one way to solve the big data problem
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the issue with this is that recent survey found about 65 percent
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organizations
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I expect their demand will outpace supply so this is really not a scalable
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solution
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if we want big data products to live and thrive in organizations
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so the question is how do we move from
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very promising technology that we know has the potential to change the world
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to something like this where its
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its cutting-edge technology that’s wrapped up in a really elegant designed
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and everyone in this room I’m sure has won the sing so it’s everywhere so how
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do we move from
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all cocky technology to something like this or
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how we move away from this being a solution where one or few people with an
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organization have access to meaningful data
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to empowering entire team retire organization from executives to managers
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to line a business users
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so this is exactly what our vision is a clerestory data we want to enable
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organizations to adopt a day German culture
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we’re doing this in two different ways we’re investing in
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great technology we’re also investing in the user experience of a product
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and so to never talk about four principles were using a clerestory data
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to help achieve this goal so the first principle like all embrace empathy
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so this guy right here he’s about to experience
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I’m what I’m assuming is something that he generally doesn’t I don’t know for
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sure
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by imagining this guy doesn’t walk around in red high heels a lot
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right so he’s gonna slip these on and he’s gonna feel what it’s like to walk
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in these he’s probably gonna turn ankle
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he’s gonna trip over cracks in the ground he’s gonna literally feel what
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it’s like to walk in the shoes
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I think this image in braces what I feel is important for big data products
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and organizations to do to really get in the mindset of how other users are using
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big data so apathy is defined as the ability to understand and share the
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feelings of others
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was a good example so anybody recognize this
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had this in your home II know we had this I imagine
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15 20 30 years ago this was probably
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in most people’s on the United States this is the Honeywell thermostat so this
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was a device that let people obviously he can call their home
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very easy to use and it worked well fast Ford
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a few years you have a device like this so
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anybody have a device like this in the house
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yeah up to me the start up into my eyes is
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technology guiding the design a product so
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I’m gonna resist the temptation to talk too much about it but I have to mention
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it if you just look at the interface for this product
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it’s such a mass right like were you click are were you
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already touched a thing like what a resource we looking at everything sorted
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at the same visual level if you look at the bottom buttons are if you could see
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it
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for the the hierarchy to information architecture this product
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you know the button say things like you know
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a schedule hold clock screen more like what does that mean
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are you expect users to really embrace effect technology
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there’s other all sorts of other things like a comment on the surface so this
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I think sort of the than the most devastating par this product is this
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this actually has technology
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that could help homeowners home homeowners that people are using this
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product save a lot of money
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and if you imagine if most homes in america fully utilize all the
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the technical abilities of this product it can address
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significant problems right you could really decrease the amount of energy
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needed to he Holmes
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I have to venture most people who use this product
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probably have it on hold already might be program just because the person who
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install this
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showed him how to program it
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we contrast that with a product like this so this is ness how many people
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know about this product
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yes a lot homie actually have one were taken a few people
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so I’ll we have people over it I made you purposely shown this device
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yep so me whoever thought a year or two ago that a home thermostat unit would be
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something you’re proud to show people
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so you know nest if you don’t know what it is it’s a self-learning
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device so you you you can use an awful different ways but when we do you just
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install it
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and is wrapping really great technology that learns when you’re coming in going
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in itself adjust the temperature of your house
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based on that and also has interface a really nice interface allows you to
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manually control at
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both on the unit itself and on a handheld device
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I’m you know a guy named a former Apple employee 20 fidel actually leads this
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group up so he he comes from a company Apple
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that sort of embraces this %uh but contrary to what some people think
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Tony his team didn’t go somewhere for a few months and health or some design
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center
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sort of you’ll think about this idea and suddenly emerge with this in the market
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put in a box and sell it
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in fact I know I’m Google Ventures
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invest in this company and some my former friends and colleagues actually
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worked really closely with the nest team
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they did a significant amount of up testing in this and they
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brought this into people’s homes in the observed how the use this technology
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and how they really wanted to interact with the device so relieved ness wasn’t
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born out of just a brilliant designers mind it was born out of really embracing
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and if the above people
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night think though the problem is in big data
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I think a lot of customers think that this is what big it is
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I anybody know this is see a technical unaudited is
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to MapReduce job right I had to ask them engineers at their store data for
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you know speech on earth others a MapReduce is very technical and I think
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this represents what a lot of customers in this world
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I or organisation 21 you will utilize big data
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think big data is it’s very technical is usually hard to use the no they should
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use it
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so you know they want to name a higher tax for to try to do it but
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it there’s sort of a disconnect between what customers think the solutions are
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and what we’re providing them so the question is
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hi rebuild the nest a big data so one principle is
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embracing everything I think there’s three ingredients here
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so one is actively listening to customers so are clear story when we
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talk to our customers
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we’d only asking you know can you find certain buttons can use certain
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functionality can you get through an interaction that’s important
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we also ask questions like who need access to the state a
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or when are you gonna consume the data on
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you know where are their silos an organization where data was there that
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can make better decisions
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sewer asking questions beyond sort of the simple interface questions which are
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very important to ask you make sure the right
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raskin sorta mackerel questions because we’re we’re we’re trying to get a sense
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of empathy understanding of what they’re going through
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we also your own dog food even when it’s hard
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now a lot of us in this room we’re going to get a product for an enterprise
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world this is sort of hard for us so ago by a lot of my friends and colleagues
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who worked on things like Gmail
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or Google+ for them it was easy to use your own product because it was part of
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the everyday workflow
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I’m but for us who are in for a more enterprise product this is harder cuz
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sometimes we have to
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spin up some clusters get a lot of data cost the company money to actually run
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dog food perhaps more than what
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so our colleagues have so this is hard but it’s still really important
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one thing I did when I was at the designer on AdWords was again so that’s
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shared similar are characteristics is that designers and Edwards teamwork
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advertisers so
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they were really natural using AdWords I incentivize my team by setting up
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contests and stuff for them to
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run campaigns and in the people who ran the most sex successful campaigns
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I’m there’s little incentive afterwards gotta find ways especially in enterprise
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world to get people who are designing and making a product to really
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really keep your dog on dog food now in your own dog food you also want to tell
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your product through the lens of your customer
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what I mean by this is again you’re not simply using a product to make sure
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this thing works this interaction smooth the data is loading
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that’s all very important you ought to do that we also should do things like
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what we’re trying to do it but what we’re doing exercise the data which is
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we’re loading real data into our product
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ever using the same datasets their customers are using are trying to
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uncover the same types have been sites they are
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for using in a similar searches circumstance %uh for doing so our life
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situation analysis
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will try to simulate that is a to to really feel the pain
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or feel what we’re you know bring to the customer so we can understand where the
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challenges are in that process
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principal number two everyone is a designer
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so I have found that this is sort of
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one typical way people look at how designers should work
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right mister dove of a lone surviving sorta crazy close kinda
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funky t-shirts are cut shirt other offer the basement somewhere being really
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creative
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so I find this mindset exist in both in young designers
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and organizations who are new design they think that this is how designer
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ought to work
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I call this the lone designer math which states that
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the designer’s job is to mysteriously come up with a design without any help
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across the organization
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another way to demonstrate this is you know when you hire Rockstar desired this
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is how you think they should be
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writer like Jimi Hendrix on a stage jamming out all by himself in a familiar
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face of Ray doing great things about any help from anyone else
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we’re really in the Big Data market it’s important that your designers
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in the design process looks more like this were a designer’s morow
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an orchestrator right he’s a conductor he’s helping teens think through
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problems
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so he’s pre in the same way conductor is really controlling the rhythm in the
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sound in knowing when to bring some %ah
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some insurance and then went to fathom out same way designer has two
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do similar things with an organization
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so people ask me then if this is how designer ought to work so
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you know what’s the role designer in a collaborative environment
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think there’s two things so I can mention they need to orchestrate this
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process
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so this is so important that a lot of in fact most design skills that I know of
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teach this exact skill to designers
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the other clever Dave the collaborative process when it works well that’s great
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but I’m sure a lot of people have been part of a collaborative process that
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really falls apart
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so designers aren’t really just suppose to go sit somewhere come up with
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something creative
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they have to really orchestrate this process so what that means is
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a designer has to get to know people cross organization because they need to
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know who to invite to meetings
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when they also know how to effectively run a collaborative process so that
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means getting all the rate
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things together could be sticking out you can be making sure there’s a white
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border around
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and also during the meeting it means that bit this designer needs to
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understand when voices should be heard like 100 years speak up for when a
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product manager could speak up
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or winnifred different perspective could exist right so
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maybe a product manager recognizes something happening within the
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marketplace
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desire need to sorties all these things out and during this process the designer
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needs to know at what stage is this feature so it’s a brand new feature
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we’re inventing from scratch
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well the conversation that needs to be about sorta volume
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ideas if it’s a feature that people realize it’s really not working
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buying isn’t a sport its details right in working with the
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the engineers a figure out those details so it’s really
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got being a very instrumental part is clever to process
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the second part though is the more traditional design skills
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so after the collaborative process you take the best parts of these ideas that
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were discussed so you take all the sticking out to take all the ideas that
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were discussed
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and the designer’s job then is to put those things together next for way
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so this is when the designer typically uses their formal design skills right
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although
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the stuff we typically think a designer does color space typography they make a
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really compelling experience
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the third design principle always improving never perfect
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so there’s a notion out there that a designer’s job is to make something
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perfect
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and oftentimes this leaks into a problem you need to you wanna make the perfect
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solution right away
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but my experience I have found that one the most paralyzing attitude a designer
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Ritu could have
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is to try for the strive for the perfect solution
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at the wrong time me tell you a little story so
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I anybody’s well this is Google AdWords to does anybody here use Google Adwords
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okay so we got a fair number of people so roughly
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two years prior to me joining AdWords it went through if a significant redesign
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two years later I join a team and the product look like this
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nothing significantly wrong with it looked OK little %ah today
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a lot on the buttons in different sections were inconsistent
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a lot of features and functionality were added that were sorta breaking the
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initial and tend to the design
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I and there are few other things are wrong and people on AdWords team
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knew this it wasn’t a big secret the problem was
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that Edwards is such a big product if you know anything about Google Adwords
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is
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you know very important strategic part of what Google does
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it was a big ship to turn around so there are multiple efforts both on the
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design sign the product sign engineering side to dress them these problems
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the issue was as they are focusing too much on the perfect solution
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where they want a light bite off everything at once in crate a perfect
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redesigned AdWords
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the problem was if you sorta went through the steps to
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to try to do that the effort was just too great and all those projects
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typically failed so after on
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I joined AdWords I haz a team you know
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let’s focus on something obviously trying to do everything at once isn’t
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working so let’s
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let’s focus on something we talked about you know focusing on information
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architecture which is like how the
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product is organized to talk about maybe different he
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I interactions that we can address we talked about the visual air actually
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that’s where we started
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he said you know the easiest thing we can do is
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pitch the idea where we would just touch the CSS so if you don’t know CSS is
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basically
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the park the the technology that I’m
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that creates the layout not and the button styles and all that stuff
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and so we saw that project we sold it because we saw a couple different ways
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one as we were gonna dress specific customer complaints they were hearing
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which was up the out the vertical space the product so we’re gonna just that
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well also said you know what we’re just gonna bring a level love
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Serena refresh the visual level our product for I’m show some progress that
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we’re making hand here
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and we did that we spent several months a fairly large team this is a big
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products so
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even though the description might sound not that big oven
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a project that actually was really big there’s lots of different
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you know binaries that ran this application so it’s harder than what you
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might first think
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and this is what we came up with 25 foot between
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these two things so this is the old one this is the visual refresh
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right so the differences in significant for us in this crowd
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but I can tell you people who use AdWords are in this
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multiple hours every single day and they noticed this change in the appreciate
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this change
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you know you can see we we we actually addressed some issues people had so
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you know the it’s a little tighter we also refreshed
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it look a little more modern right we brought consistency to buttons
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so we solve real problems we just didn’t try to bite off
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too much resolve this two things happened one is that there was sorta
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this negative
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you know after so many people within AdWords team sober banging their heads
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against the wall because it could make any progress on this problem
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is sort of like got people on stock it started off made people think about
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while different ways that they could tackle this problem
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and also that another thing the customers prior to this
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most reactions we got from customers when we launch something new on AdWords
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was was negative and the reason was because
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if you’d is for disrupt a workflow
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for anybody who’s is a product model hours a day you’re gonna really taken
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off
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right so you have to make sure those changes that you do um
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are well worth it and the good thing about this is because it was sore subtle
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and author like the first
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sort of change they saw that really made
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you know a difference in people’s lives even it was a small
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smaller difference but customers aren’t appreciated this
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so I think this or to pave the way up trust between us
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are the Google AdWords team and then uses that this product
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so what’s the advantage is a striving for better especially the Big Data
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market like this so one is picking a rations you can make progress
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again you know this environment here be a lotta talks you’re talking about new
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technology that could bring new ways in which we can bring data to folks
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right so quickly iterating not focusing on the perfect problem
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if you do that tennessee is to spend too much time on this one problem
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in the Big Data market there’s probably going to be technology that could change
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the way you do that
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so when you focus on making things better rather than the perfect solution
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you could enter it really quickly and can make progress on things which is
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important
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the other things a lot easier to do is king the get continual feedback and
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ideas
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and this is critical as well so can as we learn new ways organizations want to
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utilize data as we learn
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about different parts of the organization that are missing that it
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would love to have it
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this allows you to get feedback on the ideas here you’re creating to address
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those problems
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finally you don’t over engineer ideas so this is a huge mistake I see both
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designers and engineers and product managers do all the time
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which is they have technology it could do million different things
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and the over engineer the hacker have an idea in the end result usually is
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12 takes a really long time to actually get something I
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out there and to its generally harder to use
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because you’re dressing so many different possible use cases that people
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have a hard time understanding exactly what it’s supposed to do
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so if you focus on making things better rather than perfect
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you generally can avoid this temptation
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finally the fourth design principle make beauty priority
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anybody recognize this
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so this is a Braun razor so when this came out about the nineteen fifties this
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was cutting edge technology when it came to
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no shaving right mostar shares prior to this where
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the altered a razor blade chase right Sobran introduce new technology
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had like two rotating heads and although you know fancy bells and whistles that
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a you know we’re involved in this product but they also hired somebody
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named deter rounds
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and how many people have heard a bit around in this room right
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K so designers some people have
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I think if you look at this product you know it doesn’t take to Kievan I
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have a design I to recognize that the working in 1950 continues to influence
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product to use today
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I’m Sobran recognize the fact that yeah we could have really great technology
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but if we don’t embrace beauty and make something that people want you’re not
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gonna have mass adoption a product
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in fact around his face a famous and saying you know the aesthetic quality of
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a product is in a row to its usefulness
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because products we use everyday affect our person in our well-being
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now the way I would say this is that if we want people to use big data products
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every day
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if we want organizations to adopt data into their culture
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we need to have a level beauty in our product at least a level where people
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want to use your product
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so if you look a little deeper so this is what a typical personal radio look
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like in 1950
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it’s not terrible but it uses you know a lot of different services lot different
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colors
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highlights different elements you know it’s
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stone a lot of things happen lot of things are happening and
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on this device and this is what Rams introduced the market 1950
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so this is a radio again I think if you look at this you can recognize that
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sort of wire and is considered one the most iconic designers
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that ever lived me 1950 he was introducing devices that look like this
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I again I don’t think it takes too much of a keen eye 2002
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see where a how long-standing his designs were
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in terms of impacting consumer goods beyond nineteen fifty
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in fact Rams was famously quoted as saying when he was asked
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know what do you think I’m Jonathan nice work you know and what Apple’s doing
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RAM says you know up I like what jonathan’s doing in fact I
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I think it’s a compliment right so he recognize the fact that people today
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contemporaries who are dove
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design devices that we have in our pockets right now is taking cues from a
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guy 1950 so
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Rams really embraced this
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so if you look in the mid 2000 to 2004 2005
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this is a typical web analytics application so this is urgent
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here’s another one step counter right both these products
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really in my opinion under under invested
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in beauty right there off for the expensive and hard to use
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here’s another typical solution we found in about 2004 and 2005 which is
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literally taking log files from your server and jamming them into Excel
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and putting some graphs on it right so
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the folks at Adaptive Path which is a user experience design consulting in San
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Francisco that I work for
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I recognize this in fact they’re doing a lot of work with blog
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but with bloggers in in companies who are providing blogging platform for
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these folks
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and they quickly realize that bloggers in one use these tools for several
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different reasons including
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they’re expensive they’re hard to use this sort of like overkill
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and this i quali really wasn’t what they’re looking for
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so I’ll start a team that created this so this is measure map so this was
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probably 2005
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6 contrast there between what was available in the market and what we
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produced
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I so measure Matthews very cutting edge front and technology so integrated flash
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in a shemale back in 2005 if you remember
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that was sort of like where’d the cutting edge of a friend technology was
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we also really understood what bloggers wanted to get out above a web analytics
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package right they didn’t need all the
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features a function now that existed in her chin plus the confort it
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they really want to know who is visiting their blog who is looking to their blog
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what comments were being left on a blog where those were being left
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and who were reading the posts right so we made a product that was beautifully
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designed for
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for these people and so what are the different parts
24:10
a beauty right Sunday 1 parts a visual air
24:14
and this is probably the most standard way in which people think exists
24:18
so in the day to prosecute be the typography
24:21
the collar size the visualizations all these are very important things to
24:24
invest in we’re trying to make here for product
24:28
but there’s also parts like the interaction layer or
24:31
the application flows that facilitate user tasks
24:34
right if you invest in these things and you make these beautifully fission
24:37
you make these work really really well as another way you can invest in beauty
24:44
its nor the information architecture lehrer or
24:47
how the product is organized so much a map we you know we got rid of the very
24:51
long list of things and left hand side long list I’ve
24:54
love differ report taking it we boil it down to exactly what we knew our
24:58
audience wanted
24:59
writes a beauty can live at the information architecture layers well
25:03
and finally at the application layer or so the overall experience self
25:06
up the product you know one thing I do is if you’re using an application online
25:10
product
25:11
any notice maybe one or two though sections are designed really well
25:14
look at my have really great visualizations or you know
25:18
one home screen looks really good then he started move away from that path
25:21
again to different parts the application and design quickly falls apart
25:26
to me that’s a that’s at least one indication that the the people who are
25:29
making their product
25:30
art really investing in so the application-level level
25:33
beauty of their product and so all these parts the visual air the interaction
25:37
where the information architecture
25:39
and the entire sort of way the product put together is very important you’re
25:42
trying to make beauty priority
25:46
let me tell you one last story here so this is Google Analytics
25:50
how to be less room use Google Analytics Sollazzo
25:54
this is what we launched and a May of 2007 so this is
25:59
little bit of history so Google bought her chin
26:02
which was won the prosecution great technology
26:06
a year later they acquired measure map
26:09
the first time the first day we got to go after the shortest for the free food
26:12
was in where the massage therapists where
26:14
it’s a great job on measure map to help us redesign Google Analytics
26:18
and so well we did we first
26:21
server embraced embassy
26:24
we went to users with the people who we know we want to use Google Analytics
26:28
before we even had any interface we didn’t have any product
26:31
we talk to these customers we have some know how do you measure success we’re
26:35
looking at our web-site
26:36
who uses web analytics to make decisions every day
26:40
where an organization does web analytics work
26:43
or does it doesn’t work were doesn’t work and so we really want to get the
26:47
mindset of how people were using web analytics
26:50
we also up we knew that
26:54
although we’re hot we’re acquired for design town we knew that we could design
26:57
it all by ourselves so we can go somewhere in Google
27:00
suppressor cells in a corner somewhere we actively engaged everybody involved
27:05
in analytics product
27:06
right now included sales included engineering thank Ludik
27:09
product managers and every day we’re meeting with these folks and we’re
27:12
understand technology could same time they are rewriting technology
27:16
we’re rewriting the user interface and design a product
27:19
so we influence design as much as they influence are we influence engineering
27:24
because we show them what we want to do with design
27:26
and they influence what we could do with the design because we had a really firm
27:29
understanding of where the technology was going
27:32
the product managers help us understand you know where the market was gonna go
27:35
like what features and functionality they did these customers need
27:40
and sales support we learn from them like how do you sell a product like this
27:43
what are people looking for when you’re looking for an analytic solution
27:48
we also left room for beauty right we knew that if we wanted people to use
27:52
analytics on the way
27:54
that Google wanted people to use it which is basically mass adoption
27:58
we knew this product had a look have had a certain level of that beauty
28:03
and so we left room for that so what that meant was that
28:06
it took a little more time to do things wanna make sure things were
28:09
a line in a way that perhaps other products for we invested in a in the
28:13
visual air
28:13
right this is sort of a a rich dashboard
28:17
we spend a lot time figuring out left-hand navigation you see this a lot
28:20
smaller than some of the other products rights we have visitors traffic sources
28:23
content in goals
28:24
the boil down to what we felt was the most important I’ll
28:28
parts of the application so we sorta let beauty exist in this product
28:33
and result in this is the most recent public survey I found
28:37
is today Google Analytics uses is used
28:40
I by about 50 percent of all web sites which is about 80 percent market share
28:46
so the point there is when you wrap a really great experience around
28:49
cutting-edge technology that Google Analytics
28:52
you could disrupt the market in significant ways
28:55
so the view we have a clerestory data is that
28:59
if you want once the balanced equation when you invest equally in design
29:04
and technology and you embrace somebody’s design principles like
29:08
empathy and embrace or to the team a collaborative environment
29:12
where everyone is a designer with an organization any focus on improving
29:16
things rather than the perfect solution
29:18
and any make beauty priority
29:22
think that’s when we’ll have products enable organizations to adopt a data
29:25
driven culture
29:29
thank you
29:36
oMG I think a know when I’m I have a small conversation if you have questions
29:40
on my also have office hours right after this so it’s an exhibit hall table a few
29:44
want to continue this conversation
29:45
thanks or out
29:49
pay attention here so I do have a couple questions on
29:52
and I’m unfortunately have to lean forward to speak into the mic rather
29:55
than
29:56
I’m limit I will ask him questions um
30:00
I I’m thrilled you brought up
30:03
did a Rams because he had such a huge influence
30:06
um one thing that I was i warnings if your gonna put any of his design
30:10
principles of on-screen and I
30:12
if you wanna mention this briefly I can mention this briefly
30:15
yeah well so if you google did around probably one for search results will see
30:19
is
30:20
he actually published in Smith’s a poster it’s these ten principles and
30:23
great design
30:24
on and the aesthetic Prince why talk about was wanna tan
30:28
know he talks about how I mean he had a very specific way to design which is
30:32
great
30:32
recommendation on a look at it awesome the one to remember a time I had
30:36
now or he’s famous you look at his product you could tell he sort of
30:39
embraces less is more right so that was a big thing for contrast in nineteen
30:43
fifties enough
30:45
personal radio with what he introduced the market he basically eliminated all
30:49
unnecessary elements only boil down to service at
30:52
its essence so if you look at all the products that Rams designed for Bron
30:56
he really embraces that empathy RR that point of view
31:00
I in a good designs innovative i think is another one he says right so
31:04
good design how I interpret that switching to Big Big Data market is that
31:08
you know design coupled with great technology is
31:11
is what is one way to bring market a great product and and one other thing
31:16
that I
31:17
that I took away from my reading a Rams is that on he he talks about beauty but
31:21
he very clearly
31:23
a spells out that is and functionality matters efficiency matters it’s not just
31:29
the statics
31:30
and that there’s I if you look at beauty as a anesth
31:33
as static only depth it’s very thin
31:36
and you can actually get to give a proud to get a product that’s been be made
31:39
pretty on the surface but doesn’t have that
31:41
that def the functionality and I think it’s a fascinating insight given it he
31:44
was dealing with
31:44
razors and radios and physical things that didn’t
31:47
you known the radio 1950 was not a particularly sophisticated interface an
31:52
hour dealing with
31:53
arbitrarily complex interfaces and I think I think the things that he was
31:56
aware of the things that he was talking about
31:58
decades ago are are probably more applicable now than they were then
32:02
so the point is tingly enough you know the one point is you know beauty doesn’t
32:05
only exist at the visual level
32:07
cabin interaction level Ohio your parties organized
32:10
answer to the holistic view of your product one last question and take as
32:15
long as you own this
32:16
what’s what’s next in terms love good statics
32:19
and and good functionality in good design when it comes to big data when it
32:23
comes to visualization when it comes to you
32:25
access and getting knowledge at the Big Data yeah so
32:28
you know what I found is appropriately sell a lot of companies focus on the
32:32
visualization and I think that’s fine should continue to do that
32:34
I we should make great revelations that deal with big data
32:38
but I think there’s also so many other parts of the big data problem
32:41
need really solid design thinking I you know
32:45
it sorta ranges from how do you get data
32:48
out love serve all the silence that exist into a product
32:52
like that’s not in my mind not only a technical problem it’s also could be a
32:56
design problem
32:57
right howdy effectively get data from
33:00
an application out to organization that’s a huge problem so I do in power
33:04
all these people
33:05
I you know how do you
33:08
how do you look at it in different contexts like is it
33:12
life situation analysis or is it sorta after an event
33:15
sort of all these things I think are only just about visualizations rates
33:19
it’s the holistic sort of dealing with the big data problem from sir this
33:22
perspective